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Native Nevada

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Summer 2021 Podcast: Native Nevada, an 8-part podcast series on the culture, issues, and perseverance of Nevada’s Indigenous Peoples. Produced by Nevada Public Radio and receiving financial support of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians.

“Hey (insert smart speaker name), play latest episode of Native Nevada podcast.”

Key Links
knpr.org/series/native-nevada
facebook.com/nevadapublicradio

Facebook Events
https://www.facebook.com/events/332897124872126

Production Team

  • Richard Boland, host, who is Timbisha Shoshone. He’s devoted much of his life to Native issues, including a high-profile land reclamation effort you can read about.
  • Jarrette Werk: A’aniiih and Nakoda from Fort Belknap Montana and has been living in Northern Nevada since 2014. Jarrette is an independent journalist and photographer who focuses on rewriting the narrative of Indigneous Peoples within the media. Read more.
  • Avory Wyatt: Wašiw and Numu and grew up on the Hungry Valley Reservation in Sparks, Nevada. Avory is a land defender, water protector, and social justice activist who has worked closely with both Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities alike.
  • KNPR Senior Writer and Producer Heidi Kyser
  • KNPR News Director Joe Schoenmann
  • Executive Producer, Open Conversation, Regina Revazova

The People from Here
https://knpr.org/knpr/2021-05/chapter-2-people-here-0

In August 2020, an offensively named public agency in a small town near Lake Tahoe voted unanimously to change its name to Olympic Valley Public Service District. Its namesake ski resort is also dropping the racial slur from its name, though it hasn’t picked a new one yet (as of production time). In this episode, we explore the violent history contained in the “S-word,” what led to getting rid of it, and how the change opens a door to healing for the Washoe people driven from their ancestral lands.

The Teachers
https://knpr.org/knpr/2021-06/chapter-3-education

Native educators from around the state have banded together to tackle issues plaguing K-through-12 education, from a lack of student data being shared with tribes, to the erasure and misrepresentation of Natives in elementary curricula.(Chapter 3: The Teachers) drops tomorrow on #KNPR and wherever you listen to podcasts. Native Nevada is made possible with support from the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians.

23:30 Why even learn an Indigenous language? Rabbitbrush example

Mentioned

Indigenous Education and Empowerment: International Perspectives. Contemporary Native American Communities #17

https://www.facebook.com/Empowered-Indigenous-Educators-109705110847474/

Background

unlv.edu: Richard Boland is a member of the Timbisha Shoshone Tribe of California and Nevada. He was born in Los Angeles and, from the age of eleven, lived on his ancestral homelands in Death Valley National Park. After graduating from Pasadena City College, he returned to Death Valley to work for his tribe. In that capacity, he was responsible for assembling a coalition that eventually created his tribe’s first reservation of 7,500 acres of land located in two states and three counties. Boland left the Timbisha Shoshone Tribe to work for the steward of his tribe’s aboriginal homelands: the National Park Service, where he served as a conflict resolution specialist and coordinator of Death Valley National Park’s Government Performance and Results Act program.

Wikipedia
List of Indian reservations in Nevada

Planeta

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