home 2021, Nature State of the World’s Trees 2021

State of the World’s Trees 2021

Report Cover

What we’re reading: 2021’s State of the World’s Trees prepared by Botanic Gardens Conservation International

Key Links
bgci.org
launch
global-tree-assessment
report (PDF)
@bgci

Questions

  • Is the report available in other languages? In an audio format?
  • What are the follow-up actions in development now?
  • Which are the leading botanic gardens in tree conservation?

Headlines
One in three trees face extinction in wild, says new report
Some 30% of global tree species at risk of extinction -report
Up to half of world’s wild tree species could be at risk of extinction

Press Release

(London, UK) — Today, Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) has published a landmark State of the World’s Trees report. The report, compiling work led by the Global Tree Assessment (GTA), is the culmination of five years of research to identify major gaps in tree conservation efforts. It is one of the first assessments of the world’s threatened trees. 

Examining the globe’s 60,000 tree species, it reveals that 30% (17,500) of tree species are currently at risk of extinction. That means there are twice the number of threatened tree species globally than threatened mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles combined.  

Over 440 tree species are right on the brink of extinction, the report reveals, meaning they have fewer than 50 individuals remaining in the wild. These species are found all over the world, from the Mulanje cedar in Malawi, with only a few remaining individuals on Mulanje Mountain, to the Menai whitebeam found only in North Wales, which has only 30 trees remaining.

The report finds hope for the future, however, as conservation efforts led by the botanical community worldwide are growing. Identifying which trees are at risk and ensuring these are protected is the most effective way to prevent extinction and restore endangered species. The report reveals that at least 64% of all tree species can be found in at least one protected area, and about 30% can be found in botanic gardens, seed banks, or other ex situ collections, but further action is needed.

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Related

fao.org/state-of-forests
fs.usda.gov

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